The Sportsmans Arms

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The Sportsman’s Arms now Known as the Scullery

The Sportsman’s Arms closed on the 05-02-2010 when it closed it was left empty for a few years until a plumbing business opened up a showroom and office in the premises the company owners decided as they were not using all of the building so decided to rent out the old lounge at the rear of the pub

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The Sportsmans Arms Silksworth was once one of the most important buildings in Silksworth

Images taken by Dave Bell

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I took these images from the bottom of High Newport Allotments in May 2010 when the Sportsman’s Arms sadly closed and ended one of the last places that was used and built for the miners and their families of Silksworth very little remains of the miners heritage in Silksworth nowadays

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The once proud sign of the Sportsman’s Arms now looks tired and weary

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Notice the boarded up windows and The Sportsmans Arms sign still swinging as if everything was ok image taken on a wet and windy very cold day

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Close up of the sign on the rear wall of The Sportsmans Arms which closed in May 2010 because of lost revenue caused by very few local people using the public house

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The Sportsmans Arms puplic house built for the miners of Silksworth in 1871 as Silksworth Colliery grew new houses were built for the miners and their families and not forgetting why The Sportsmans Arms built for the miners when they had finished their shifts and to socialise when not working

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Silksworth Colliery shaft was sunk in 1869 In 1871, according to the Census there were approx 800 people living in the Silksworth and Tunstall areas, the local area was mainly farmland and where most people worked on the land.

Tomato’s Grown on High Newport Allotments

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Gardeners Delght seedlngs sown on the 23-02-18 seed bought from Wilkos

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Image of the aluminium greenhouse where I grow my tomato’s the greenhouse is very old and I have been using it for about fifteen years

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I was preparing the tomato’s for the coming season and you can see I have got about half of the greenhouse planted out the seedling are in the background amongst the chaos I have created

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The tomato’s in this image have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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Notice the grape vine growing on the right hand side

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Close up of the tomato’s which have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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The tomato variety shown in this image are my favourite Gardeners Delight which to grow very well and are not suspetable to many growing problems or diseases

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The tomatos look happy enough and seem to be growing well in their grow pots I always use grow bags as the base component for gowing them in

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Notice the grape vine which is a strawbery tasting type in the back ground its looking really healthy and the main thing it tastes great and there are no pips

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It normally takes about a week to get all the tomato plants into their grow pots and the other containers I use

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Sunday, 25 October 2020

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Silksworth Colliery

Silksworth: In this township is situated the extensive Silksworth Colliery, the property of the Marquis of Londonderry, and one of the largest in the county of Durham. It was commenced to be sunk in 1868, and the seams now working were first wrought in 1872. The principal seams are the "Maudlin," about 5 feet 9 inches thick, and the "Hutton," 4 feet thick; the former at a depth of 270 fathoms, and the latter 290. The colliery is fitted with all modern appliances and gives employment to 2000 men and boys. The output, which is mostly shipped at Sunderland docks, averages between 2000 and 2500 tons per day. The colliery is situated about a mile north of the village.

The village of Old Silksworth is little more than a quiet hamlet, pleasantly situated, three and a half miles south-west from Sunderland, and about a mile south-west from the colliery village, New Silksworth. Near the colliery, there are a few houses occupied by the colliery officials.

New Silksworth is a populous colliery village, three miles south-south-west from Sunderland, entirely of a mining community. There are the usual shops, schools, and chapels. The village is almost entirely within the township of Tunstall, and the houses seem somewhat superior to the older colliery villages.

There is no railway communications, therefore brakes and buses ply daily between here and Sunderland.

The Colliery School is a large building, erected by the Marquis of Londonderry (the colliery proprietor) in 1875. It provides rooms for 290 boys, 290 girls, and 270 infants, and has an average attendance of 230 boys, 230 girls, and 172 infants. A house for the master and another for the mistress are provided.

The Miners Hall - This fine building is situated in Blind Lane, and was commenced about April 1893. It is a spacious building of brick, with stone facings in the Italian style, comprising large lecture-hall, with gallery and platform well lighted and tastefully decorated. This hall, which may be let for all kinds of public entertainments, will seat 900. On the right of the hall are billiard, reading, and recreation rooms. The total cost, with the site, amounted to £3300. It is the property of the Miners' Union.