The Sportsmans Arms

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The Sportsman’s Arms now Known as the Scullery

The Sportsman’s Arms closed on the 05-02-2010 when it closed it was left empty for a few years until a plumbing business opened up a showroom and office in the premises the company owners decided as they were not using all of the building so decided to rent out the old lounge at the rear of the pub

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The Sportsmans Arms Silksworth was once one of the most important buildings in Silksworth

Images taken by Dave Bell

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I took these images from the bottom of High Newport Allotments in May 2010 when the Sportsman’s Arms sadly closed and ended one of the last places that was used and built for the miners and their families of Silksworth very little remains of the miners heritage in Silksworth nowadays

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The once proud sign of the Sportsman’s Arms now looks tired and weary

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Notice the boarded up windows and The Sportsmans Arms sign still swinging as if everything was ok image taken on a wet and windy very cold day

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Close up of the sign on the rear wall of The Sportsmans Arms which closed in May 2010 because of lost revenue caused by very few local people using the public house

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The Sportsmans Arms puplic house built for the miners of Silksworth in 1871 as Silksworth Colliery grew new houses were built for the miners and their families and not forgetting why The Sportsmans Arms built for the miners when they had finished their shifts and to socialise when not working

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Silksworth Colliery shaft was sunk in 1869 In 1871, according to the Census there were approx 800 people living in the Silksworth and Tunstall areas, the local area was mainly farmland and where most people worked on the land.

Tomato’s Grown on High Newport Allotments

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Gardeners Delght seedlngs sown on the 23-02-18 seed bought from Wilkos

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Image of the aluminium greenhouse where I grow my tomato’s the greenhouse is very old and I have been using it for about fifteen years

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I was preparing the tomato’s for the coming season and you can see I have got about half of the greenhouse planted out the seedling are in the background amongst the chaos I have created

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The tomato’s in this image have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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Notice the grape vine growing on the right hand side

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Close up of the tomato’s which have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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The tomato variety shown in this image are my favourite Gardeners Delight which to grow very well and are not suspetable to many growing problems or diseases

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The tomatos look happy enough and seem to be growing well in their grow pots I always use grow bags as the base component for gowing them in

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Notice the grape vine which is a strawbery tasting type in the back ground its looking really healthy and the main thing it tastes great and there are no pips

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It normally takes about a week to get all the tomato plants into their grow pots and the other containers I use

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Saturday, 25 September 2021

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Water Use On The Allotment

Water use on allotments

Water is a vital ingredient for all plot-holders growing fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers but it is a precious resource and can be a significant cost for allotment authorities. On sites with a mains water supply it should be used in a sensible and considerate manner by all. Where possible every gardener should have water butts to harvest any rain that does fall. This is vital when the plot has a greenhouse or polytunnel as this increases watering requirements significantly. Click here to download the NAS leaflet on Water Use.

The best time to water your crops is in the evening or very early morning, using a watering can and aiming at the roots not the foliage. Water thoroughly on a weekly basis and soak the soil, this encourages the roots to go deeper in search of moisture. Water appropriately to the crop, plants also need different amounts of water at varying stages of growth and too much water can affect yield and taste.

Cucurbits Squash can survive and produce fruits from minimal watering but courgette plants need to be kept constantly moist. Fruiting crops Aubergines, cucumbers, sweet corn and tomatoes need constant water throughout their growing period. Leafy vegetables and salad crops Crops such as cabbages, chard and spinach along with salad crops need water at every stage of growth. Legumes Avoid watering peas and broad beans when young but they will need water at flowering time and about 2 weeks later. Runner beans need constant moisture but French beans can cope with dryer conditions. Onions etc Water to establish and then only in dry spells. Potatoes Water regularly from 6-10 weeks after planting when they start to produce tubers. Root crops Carrots and parsnips will split if watered irregularly, water before dry conditions develop. Stem vegetables Celery, celeriac and Florence Fennel need copious amounts of water to develop and will be damaged by drought conditions.

Planting out - When planting out young plants it is always recommended that you water the hole or trench very well, before putting in your seedlings. This means the root system of your young plant will have instant access to water, also encouraging them to grow downwards to seek new water supplies.

Mulching - a 2 to 3 inch layer of mulch over the soil will help to retain moisture in the summer, suppress weeds, improve soil texture and release nutrients. Apply when the soil is wet and warm in autumn or spring and take care not to pile up against plants stems as it will cause them to rot. Compost companies offer a vast choice of ready -made products containing bark, seaweed, bracken etc. Alternatively can use your own allotment compost or materials such as well- rotted manure, leaf mould, spent mushroom compost, bark or grass clippings.

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The steel gates and fence that were erected by Sunderland Council when they purchased the land of the NCB in the mid ninteies

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Image of the Scullery eatery which was formerly the Sportsmans Arms which was built for the miners of Silksworth Colliery

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Silksworth Lane the road that connects Silksworth village to Sunderland city centre

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This peoples crossing was built by Sainsbury's when they built the store in Silksworth in the mid nineties

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The roundabout at the bottom of High Newport Allotments which is very busy most days

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The gates and fence were built by Sunderland Council when they bought the land of the NCB in 1996

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The entrance to High Newport Allotments showing the local DIY dealers sign details notice they dont charge for allotment members deliverys

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Close up of the gates notice the shadows and the purple flowers on the right hand side of the road

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The warning sign that warns visitors to High Newport Allotments that they enter at their own risk

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View of the road just after one enters through the gates of High Newport Allotments with the speed control sign

The entrance to High Newport Allotments on a lovely summers morning

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